Monday, July 6, 2009

My World Tuesday


Go visit the My World site to see more of our world - or participate yourself!




Today I'm taking you to the Japanese Garden in Hermann Park in Houston, Texas. The last time we visited, the local bonsai club was having an exhibition.





An important part of making the park sparkle is the meticulous landscaping and gardens found there. An exquisite Japanese Garden redefines beauty Japanese style. The Daimyo garden, with its gentle waterfalls, lanterns, and teahouse provides a place for quiet contemplation a universe away from the bustle of the City.





Ducks and turtle (all of the pictures can be made larger by clicking on the photo).



The teahouse, built in Japan and carefully reconstructed on site by Japanese craftsmen, is a uniquely Japanese structure. Japan’s former Prime Minister Kaifu is responsible for bringing the Teahouse to Houston.

Located on nearly five-hundred acres just south of Downtown, the park is home to an excellent zoo (see Camera Critters posts for short visits to the zoo), outstanding Science Museum, gardens, family attractions and plenty of wide open spaces, Houston Garden Center, McGovern Lake, a railroad for the kids, Miller Outdoor Theater, a golf course -- lots of fun!

Hermann Park isn’t just IN the heart of the city, it IS the HEART of the city. For the past couple of decades it has also been the focus of a concentrated effort to make it one of the finest city parks in the nation.


There is a lot more to see in Hermann Park. This is just our first visit.




26 comments:

Alicia @ boylerpf said...

I am fascinated by the Japanese gardens...such clean lines and everything neat and tidy. What a great place to visit!

itsnotjustapicture said...

beautiful gardens...something i would love to visit. now do they hold tea ceremonies at the tea house?
have a lovely afternoon.

Kate T. said...

What a beautiful spot! It's wonderful for you to have such a place to go and recharge your batteries, so to speak.

My brother is a 5th degree black belt in Aikido and teaches out in Seattle. He's completely immersed himself in the Japanese culture, and he's transformed his house and yard into something of a Japanese garden and sanctuary. It's a beautiful thing.

Kate

Carver said...

Thanks for the tour of the beautiful garden. Great shots and narrative.

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Hermann Park is HUGE. I went there a few times for various events--but never did see it all. I hope you go back, Snap, and show us more pictures of that gorgeous park.

Hugs,
Betsy

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

Great photos and comments. I need to get back to Hermann Park. When I lived there decades ago it was the place to be. Looks like it still is.

Sally in WA said...

Such a lovely park you've shown us. It looks so serene and peaceful. Something I could use more of these days. Thanks for sharing it and for visiting me.

Louise said...

What a beautiful place. If I'm ever in the area, it will definitely be on my list of places to visit. If I lived in the area, I think I would want to go there all the time! Thanks for this nice post.

SandyCarlson said...

That park is a neat place! Thanks for the tour.

Julia said...

Oh, this ii such a beautiful post...I love all things japanese, especially their gardens and simplistic beautiful way of doing things...Love the bonsai, how wgret to have a japanese garden near you to visit.....
I love your explanation for my Giveaway
question....I think it sounds right to me...xx...Julia

Barb said...

I love urban oases - quiet places of reflection in the hustle and bustle. Your pictures do the garden justice - looks like a very inviting spot for relaxation and contemplation.

Sara said...

BHeautiful, beautiful gardens! I love gardens...

Thanks for visiting my blog - I'll be back to see yours...

Enjoyed your Dayook from yesterday too...

Pam said...

What a delightful park. It looks so peaceful and serene. I sure would enjoy visiting there.

George said...

I love this Japanese Garden. Thanks for taking us along.

Monica said...

When I moved to San Francisco as a teenage, that was the first time I saw a Japanese Garden and ultimately fell in love with the place. We have one here in Seattle too that I now enjoy. If I get to Houston, I'll be sure to check this out due to your photos.

The Bodhi Chicklet said...

Beautiful! Such meticulous care in bonsai and Japanese gardens (and tea service). I feel like a big oaf whenever I am around things like that. And having a park like that in the heart of your city is a treasure.

Arija said...

Japanese gardens have such lovely hrmony..so soothing. Nice post.

Jenn Jilks said...

A beautiful art form. Thanks for visiting My Muskoka, too. So many places, with so many sights.

Kathiesbirds said...

It all looks so lovely and I bet there are lots of birds there! I would love to visit.

Rosa said...

How gorgeous! Wow. I tried to do bonsai once. They need a lot of water. I don't do water. xo

KarenHarveyCox said...

What a wonderful park. There used to be a large garden of Bonsai trees in Hong Kong Park. There is something so peaceful about them.

I will go and see My World Tuesday now. Have a wonderful day.

Karen

Debra W said...

Happy belated birthday!

Thank you so much for popping over to my site and saying hello! I love meeting new bloggers! Maria-Therese is such a lovely person, so I am very happy to know that we have her in common.

I really enjoyed this post. What a gorgeous, serene park. I will definitely be back to read more.

Hugs,
Debbie

Lew said...

With exhibits like this, Houston has a fine park! You have some great shots! I especially like the Japanese house. Thanks for visiting my world.

This Is My Blog - fishing guy said...

Snap: What a beautiful place with such a neat set of photos.

Janie said...

That looks like a great place to visit. The gardens look lovely, and I'm fascinated by the teahouse.

Carole said...

Lovely.

We have a Japanese Garden here in Oregon too, and it's such a tranquil place to visit. I don't get there as often as I used to (live farther away from it now), but was there in the spring when everything was just starting to bloom.